Pacific Green picks up more scrubber orders for Scorpio fleets

Paul Gunton
Paul Gunton
ShipInsight

12 July 2019


US-based scrubber manufacturer, Pacific Green Technologies has picked up orders for a further 23 scrubber systems to be supplied to ships operated by Scorpio Tankers and Scorpio Bulkers.

Scorpio Tankers has confirmed that it has ordered a further 14 ENVI-Marine emission control systems for vessels it owns or manages in 2020, at a combined cost of $20.3m. The order is on top of the 52 Systems already ordered by Scorpio Tankers announced in December 2018. The Systems that are being fitted are a 'hybrid ready' design, which allows them to be upgraded to a 'closed loop' configuration at a future date. A further 9 ENVI-Marine systems have been ordered by Scorpio Bulkers adding to the 28 also ordered last December. These are also the 'hybrid ready' design.

Pacific Green Technologies Executive Director Scott Poulter said, "This is a further vote of confidence in Pacific Green's Technologies and our ability to build and marine scrubbers on time and on budget. Scorpio Tankers and Scorpio Bulkers have invested in the latest generation of fuel-efficient vessels and the hybrid-ready ENVI-Marine system will give the companies the return-on-investment and flexibility needed to face the complexities of IMO 2020."

Pacific Green Technologies has the scale and manufacturing ability to deliver large orders thanks to its partnership with PowerChina SPEM. PowerChina is one of the world's largest engineering procurement construction companies with 2018 revenues of $59.93 billion. "We are one of the few marine scrubbing companies with the scale to fulfil major orders. We now have an order book in excess of $200m and the technical know-how, the people and the facilities to manufacture our Systems on a large scale," added Scott Poulter.

The ENVI-Marine system is a new generation of scrubbing technology with no moving parts. Using a patented TurboHead process, flue gases are quenched and cleaned by frothing through pure seawater and then discharged as harmless salts.